July 26--The Breeze From Barmet Bay

Jul. 26th, 2017 10:07 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I accomplished pretty much everything I planned to accomplish today, in spite of a lack of motivation to do much of any of it. I stayed up late listening to music, and anticipated sleeping in this morning, but ended up waking up at 7:30 and getting up, which portended favorably toward the tasks I needed to do.

After I did some chores around the house, I went into work and dug into the last part of the curriculum revision I am working on. It involves obtaining emergency IV access by drilling a catheter into the marrow space of a large bone. I was trained how to do this when I was a Rapid Response Nurse, and did it twice in real life before moving on to teaching. It's pretty amazing. In about 90 seconds or less, you have a stable IV access that you can use for resuscitation.

Since the curriculum is for nursing students, I pretty much stuck with the basics, and tossed in some interesting videos. I finished the revisions, but want to review them before I upload them to our course page, and send them off to the other programs that will use them. It's the first time I have done anything that other programs will use, and I want to make sure it is correct.

I came home for lunch, then walked along the creek for a bit. It was getting pretty hot, and I didn't go far.

creek reflection

After walking, I went to the grocery store where they have one of the coin counting machines. The way the machines work is that you put the coins in and select an option for payment. If you select a cash payment, the service deducts something like 11.5% of the total and gives you a voucher to take to the checker. If you select to receive a gift card, to something like Amazon, or other places, you get it all, but have to spend it at the place you select. You can also opt to have it donated to a charity of your choice, in which case the entire amount goes to charity.

Malida and I talked it over and decided to do a third of each.

I mentioned previously that the can that the coins are in is too heavy to lift. Malida had the idea of putting them in some empty nut containers we had. I filled one this morning and took it in. It is about 1/6 of the total coins in the can.

coin jar

Care to guess what it weighs, and how much it translated into?

After that I went to the hardware store and got some more stuff to fix my leaky irrigation system. I will work on it in the morning when the windshield repair person is replacing my windshield.

Skwentna River Exploration

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:51 pm
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[personal profile] ranunculus
 One lovely, sunny day we made a trip upriver about 5 miles to the junction of the Skwentna and the Yentna rivers. Cut for pictures ) The Skwentna comes from the Aleutian Range and the Yentna comes from Denali.   It was a lovely warm day. Denali, tallest mountain in the USA at 20,310 feet, was peeking over the trees to the northeast.


Arriving at the junction we parked our boat on the edge of a big sandbar and had lunch.

 

 

Of course at the sandbar we were a good five and a half miles closer to the telephone tower, improving reception to barely marginal to pretty good.

M and Donald had both seen tracks ranging from tiny birds to giant moose. After lunch Donald Tazlina and I strolled up the sandbar which seemed firmly attached to the western bank.

Here are a few of the tracks we found:

Moose

Coyote or small wolf.

 

Tazlina posing with cotton grass

 

Mr Bear

Mr Bear got around.  He certainly came down to the river and checked on the fish run.  Here are his footprints in the water.


Mr Eagle


After our stroll around the sand bank M and I tried our hand at fishing.  Zero luck despite the fact that we SAW at least 10 fish.  On our way downstream we passed "our" fishwheel, a community fishwheel, one of four I know of on the Yentna.  See my post of two years ago about my fishwheel experience.  http://ranunculus.dreamwidth.org/466071.html








Yentna/Skwentna River

Jul. 26th, 2017 07:11 pm
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[personal profile] ranunculus

Donald, M and I flew out to Julie and Andy’s cabin on July 15th, returning on July 24th. Cut for length and pictures Enter your cut contents here.

The round trip bush plane trip for all three of us, plus dog, plus supplies for an eight day stay, was less than a thousand dollars.
Our plane was an ancient but very well kept DeHavalland Beaver, a renown plane in bush circles.
http.bush-planes.com/DeHavilland-DHC-2-Beaver.html  
We took off from Lake Hood airport, the busiest seaplane airport in the world averaging 190 flights a day, and landed on the Yentna river, very close to our final destination. Here we are saying goodby to the pilot.

 

Andy picked us up in the boat and ferried us across the river to Driftwood.

Driftwood used to be a “lodge” catering mostly to fishermen during the salmon season. In addition to the main cabin it has a number of outbuildings: three bedroom structures, bathhouse/sauna, shop, fishing equipment shed, wood shed and now the “new Lodge”.   Here are two pictures, of the new lodge, one taken two years ago and one on this trip.

The new lodge is up on those tall stilts because the area regularly floods one to three feet in the winter. So the first four or five feet is to keep the lodge out of the floodplain, the rest of the room is for a bottom floor for utilities and shop/storage for lawn mowers, golf carts and snow machines!

One of my projects during our stay was to build a work table and some shop shelving to use during the next phase of building and to help clean up the tools and supplies that were scattered around the inside of the building.

 

Andy wanted to make part of the upstairs his “shop” until the building is complete. Below are before and after photos of upstairs.

While I was out at the new lodge I took some pictures, taking advantage of the height. The first one is of the three sleeping rooms, the second is looking back at the old main cabin and outbuildings.



Donald spent a lot of time gathering dead wood out of the surrounding woods. This helps keep things cleared out and theoretically reduces fire danger. In the end he had a huge pile to burn.


Later I'll post about our upriver adventure!


number five with bullets

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:37 pm
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[personal profile] microbie

  • I had to listen to myself while writing up notes from my last meeting at MIT. My voice sounds awful, even worse than listening to my voicemail message. As if I needed another reason to hate giving presentations.

  • For several nights in a row I had anxiety dreams set during college. Thanks, MIT!

  • I moved to a different office at work, which should be a great opportunity to finally organize my shit, but, ha.

  • I spent 10 minutes this morning defending queso to a total stranger (who likes fondue?!?). Then I offered to make him a pot of it if he's ever in DC.

  • This beer glass (from Area Four) reminds me of an Erlenmeyer flask:
    IMG_1540

July 25--Udon

Jul. 25th, 2017 10:37 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
The last time I was driving through the little rural town southeast of us that I love, I noticed that there was a new restaurant. A sushi restaurant. It seemed kind of unlikely that someone would open a sushi restaurant in what is primarily a farming town, but I guess there are a lot of non-farmer people living out that way now. Not to say that farmers don't like sushi.

Anyway, we tried it today for lunch. I don't eat sushi, but there is always stuff that I like to eat. I had a bento box with teriyaki beef. Malida had the sushi. It was quite good, and the restaurant was doing a good business.

dragon

I fooled around with the drip irrigation system this afternoon and extended it to the patio so my lime tree would get some water while we are gone. This evening it sprung a bunch of leaks, so I will have to take another look at it tomorrow. I used a section of old tubing, which I think is the problem.

I have a big crack in my windshield. Not sure what happened, but it is now extended about halfway across. I called the insurance company, and they told me they had a place that could fix it for about $400, which was $100 less than my deductible. Their first appointment was next week, in a shop that's about an hour away from me. I called around and found a place with a great reputation in the community, that will come to my house to fix it, this Thursday, for about $150 less. Easy decision.

I have to go in to work for a few hours and finish up my IV curriculum project. I don't really feel like going in, but it has to get done. I have too much else going when I get back from vacation to put it off.

I'm not ready for it to be fall yet.

Back in "civilization"

Jul. 24th, 2017 11:56 pm
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[personal profile] ranunculus
 M, Donald and I spent 8 days out in a remote Alaska cabin called Driftwood.  It was great.  Quiet and peaceful until the last couple of days when more people arrived.  Pictures coming later.

I'm looking out the window in Anchorage Alaska tonight and mourning the fact that it is ONLY 11 pm and the light is fading.  5 minutes earlier every day here.   I love long days, and always mourn and whine untll the light sees fit to return again.

July 24--The Rover

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:53 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
Today I drove to the city of Stockton to take advantage of another Ingress farm that was still up. Much of it was along the Stockton waterfront, where I had not been for many years. Stockton had a rough go of it during the economic downturn, and it still shows. Lots of empty buildings in an area that in any other city would be thriving.

The last time I was in that part of Stockton was in the early 1990s to see a baseball game. There is a minor league stadium near the waterfront. I thoroughly enjoyed that game and always meant to go back, but I never did.

I wandered around for a while and played Ingress. I didn't think to take pictures other than one of what is supposed to be a happy rock, but when I look at it now, it seems to be screaming in terror.

unhappy rock

I stopped at a place I know for lunch on the way back, and it was just about perfect. After I got home I did some chores, and in the evening sat in the back yard as the delta breeze kicked in and cooled off the temperatures.

I am in the thick of my Hardy Boys book. The thing I notice most about the older (and longer) versions, are that the descriptions of the boys' lives are richer. The author spends a couple pages describing their preparations for a camping trip, and the excitement that builds as the trip gets closer. I remember why I liked these books as a kid.

July 23--The day not much happened

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:37 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I forgot to post yesterday, probably because it was just a normal day where we went out walking along the creek, had some noodles, came home and did stuff. I used to think of this type of day as boring, but now I recognize them as oases between the various trials and tribulations that make up a good part of life. Now I savor them. There's always another storm on the horizon.

thing

I spent the afternoon finishing my coursework for my summer session and writing up a summary for my advisor. I reported 52 hours of "billable hours", which she was pleased with. The next semester starts in about 3 1/2 weeks, and I will have to do some stuff between now and then to prepare for it.

Same thing goes for work. I still have a bunch of stuff to do there to before the semester starts. I will go in Wednesday and knock some of it out.

Last night I put together our trip to Oregon for next week. I love planning trips, and thinking about what we will do along the way. We will spend a couple days in Portland, then head down the coast, and return home a week later. I have made trips similar to this many times, and the landscape is like an old friend. I made sure to include Malida's favorite Oregon Coast sushi restaurant into the plan.

sushi guy
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[personal profile] elainegrey
93.5 °F - Feels Like 106 °F

Just spent a half hour outside, and came in dripping. Ugh.

I was picking the grape tomatoes, squash, collards, and some of the popcorn. The popcorn is a mixture of strains, so every cob is a surprise. Some are much like this "glass gem" corn. Regrettably, pollination wasn't ideal, so there are lots of half populated cobs. Still, given everyone's dismissal of growing corn without a fortress around it, i'm delighted.

I ordered a dehydrator, so the large number of squash doesn't intimidate me. And now i kinda wish for exponential tomatoes, but they don't seem to be coming -- unless i want to pick green and let them ripen in the house. Which is very tempting.

Yesterday i spend outside 10 to noon doing a burn. Most of the time i spent running the hose over myself to keep cool while watching the fire. Usually i keep gathering debris, but not yesterday. I did do some weeding in the shade.

--== ∞ ==--

Christine had what seems like an elephant event last night. But maybe it was just life.

Carrie continues to negotiate bed space with the cats. Turning her back to them is the best thing she's learned so far. They know how to stand up to her when she confronts them, but a big dog back?
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
This morning i started reading about bail justice. I was aware Kamala Harris & Rand Paul -- a name pairing that really gets my attention -- had introduced legislation, and was aware of SONG's (Southerners On New Ground) work in May. So when Song sent this call, i went to read up on the bill -- and found even more information about bail justice.

Across the Southeast, we intend to initiate Free From Fear campaigns to end the practice of cash bail. We see bail outs as an ongoing tactic to build a base, to expose the crisis of cash bail and the beast that is the criminal-legal system, to change hearts and minds, to make real and material impacts on the lives of our people, and to build power. We can think of no better way to commemorate the history of Black August than to bail out as many Black women, broadly defined, and Black trans people free across the South as we can.


The "report" generated from my citation tool Zotero, is below, and you can skim the notes or follow the links for more.

Readings )
  • A Labor of Love: Black Mama's Bail Out Action + Reflection

    Type Web Page
    Author ignitekindred
    URL http://southernersonnewground.org/2017/05/a-labor-of-love/
    Date 2017-05-16T14:50:04-04:00
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Abstract [CLICK HERE FOR SPANISH TRANSLATION] 1. Putting our organizing practice into action. At SONG, our organizing practice has long been based in love, longing, and desire across class, race, gender and community. This action allowed us to demonstrate our collective belief in a shared destiny with the dreams, demands and hopes of Black women in all of our varieties at the center. Our collective cup overflowed locally and regionally with gift cards, bouquets, clothes, services offered by local practitioners, prime ...
    Website Title Southerners On New Ground
    Short Title A Labor of Love
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Defendants Can’t Be Jailed Solely Because of Inability to Post Bail, Judge Says

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Richard A. Oppel Jr
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/us/chicago-bail-reform.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-17
    Section U.S.
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract An order issued by Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans of Cook County, Ill., highlights a contentious national debate surrounding the ability of defendants to post bail.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Chicago (Ill)
    • Prisons and Prisoners

    Notes:

    • In April [2017], for example, a federal judge in Houston ruled that Harris County could not keep those arrested on misdemeanor charges in jail because they could not afford bail. The judge, Lee H. Rosenthal, who was appointed by the first President Bush, found that the system disproportionately affected indigent residents and violated “equal protection rights against wealth-based discrimination.”

      Tags:

      • Bail

    Attachments

  • Getting Rid of Bail Is Only the Start

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Ginia Bellafante
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/01/nyregion/getting-rid-of-bail-is-only-the-start.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-06-01
    Section N.Y. / Region
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Using conflict resolution and social services to keep low-level offenders out of the courts should be the next wave in criminal justice reform.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Brooklyn Community Bail Fund
    • Brooklyn (NYC)
    • Brown, David O
    • Law and Legislation
    • Poverty
    • Robberies and Thefts
  • Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul: To Shrink Jails, Let’s Reform Bail

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Kamala D. Harris
    Author Rand Paul
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/20/opinion/kamala-harris-and-rand-paul-lets-reform-bail.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-20
    Section Opinion
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Low-risk defendants shouldn’t be detained before trial just because they can’t afford it.
    Short Title Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:32 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Browder, Kalief (1993-2015)
    • Discrimination
    • Prisons and Prisoners
  • Pretrial Justice Institute

    Type Web Page
    URL http://www.pretrial.org/
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Abstract The ProblemThe American system of bail is fundamentally incapable of doing the job we expect from it. Those with money—regardless of where they got the money or their danger to the community or victims—can purchase their freedom while poor defendants … Continue reading →
    Website Title Pretrial Justice Institute
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:10 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System

    Type Web Page
    URL https://www.aclu.org/report/selling-our-freedom-how-insurance-corporations-have-taken-over-our-bail-system
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Abstract Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System is a joint report by Color of Change and the American Civil Liberties Union’s Campaign for Smart Justice that documents how the for-profit bail industry fuels mass incarceration and perpetuates racial inequalities.
    Website Title American Civil Liberties Union
    Short Title Selling Off Our Freedom
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Type Statute
    Name of Act S. 1593: A bill to provide grants to States and Indian tribes to reform their criminal justice system to encourage the replacement of the use of payment of secured money bail as a condition of pretrial release in criminal cases, and for other purposes.
    Short Title Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:36:42 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:37:42 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail

    Notes:

    • From NYT editorial, re Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act


      ...Excessive bail disproportionately harms people from low-income communities and communities of color. The Supreme Court ruled in Bearden v. Georgia in 1983 that the Constitution prohibits “punishing a person for his poverty,” but that’s exactly what this system does. Nine out of 10 defendants who are detained cannot afford to post bail, which can exceed $20,000 even for minor crimes like stealing $105 in clothing....
      ...black and Latino men respectively pay 35 percent and 19 percent higher bail than white men....

      This isn’t just unjust. It also wastes taxpayer dollars. People awaiting trial account for 95 percent of the growth in the jail population from 2000 to 2014, and it costs roughly $38 million every day to imprison these largely nonviolent defendants. That adds up to $14 billion a year.

      Bail is supposed to ensure that the accused appear at trial and don’t commit other offenses in the meantime. But research has shown that low-risk defendants who are detained more than 24 hours and then released are actually less likely to show up in court than those who are detained less than a day.

      ...

      Kentucky and New Jersey, for instance, have shifted from bail toward personalized risk assessments that analyze factors such as criminal history and substance abuse. These are better indicators of whether a defendant is a flight risk or a threat to the public and ought to be held without bail.

      Colorado and West Virginia have improved pretrial services and supervision, such as using telephone reminders so fewer defendants miss court dates and end up detained.

      These nudges work. Over the second half of 2006, automated phone call reminders in Multnomah County in Oregon, resulted in 750 people showing up in court who otherwise may have forgotten their date.

      ...

      The Pretrial Justice Institute, an organization that works to change unfair and unjust pretrial practices, estimates that bail reform could save American taxpayers roughly $78 billion a year. More important, it would help restore Americans’ faith in our justice system.

    Attachments

July 22--Veal Puccini

Jul. 22nd, 2017 09:31 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
My sister and her husband came over for dinner this evening. She is actually one of my step-sisters, but the one I grew up with, so she feels more like an actual sister. They are somewhat reclusive, so we don't see them very often, but when we do it is always great. I should note that we are also somewhat reclusive.

It was hot, so I wanted to minimize cooking indoors. I grilled a tri-tip and some ears of corn, made some basmati rice. and a chopped salad. This is the same chopped salad I have been experimenting with. I think I have it down now.

I like to put a bit of chopped up dry salami in the salad to give it some flavor. After I made it the last time, I had a dream that I had put the salami in a kitchen drawer instead of the refrigerator drawer where I keep that kind of stuff. When I looked in the drawer today for the salami, it wasn't there. I think I actually put it in a drawer somewhere. I looked but couldn't find it.

Anyway, the dinner was delicious. We spent a couple hours eating and catching up. I always enjoy their company.

I told my sister a story about the time me and my two friends flew down to LA to attend the premier of some Rolling Stones movie. This was right around the time we graduated from high school. There was a side story about magic mushrooms that got the story started, but my favorite memory was having dinner after the movie.

After the movie we went to a swanky Italian restaurant in Century City, but the host refused to seat us. We all had long hair, wore jeans, etc., and had backpacks on. This was in 1975. We looked like hippies, I guess.

The owner came up and asked what the problem was, and the host just pointed at us, like it was obvious we didn't belong there. The owner seemed to feel differently, and seated us himself, at the best table in the restaurant. He made menu suggestions. I had the Veal Puccini, which was delicious.

After the meal, he sent out a huge fruit plate, on the house, and sat with us a while to see what brought us to Century City. We told him about flying down to see the movie, and about our somewhat aborted trip to Disneyland (that's the mushroom story). He seemed fascinated by our adventure and told us to come back any time. He also gave us a nice discount on the dinner. I never made it back, unfortunately.

I did a google search and the place is long gone, but I found a newspaper write-up from 1974, which tells me the name of the restaurant was Puccini's Seafood Grotto, and that they had eight veal dishes on the menu.

I forgot to take any pictures of our dinner or us, so all I have is the shadow of my new cherry tree on my new fence.

tree shadow

July 21--Stuck in Lodi, again

Jul. 21st, 2017 09:25 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
After doing my morning stuff I took a drive down to Lodi, which is about 20 minutes south of where I live. It used to be a sleepy farming town on the railroad line, and in many ways it still is. It is also a major wine producing region, and this has brought the town back to life.

Lodi

The old town area has been revitalized, with shops, restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. The town feels vibrant--there are viable businesses, a transit hub with a bunch of little shuttle busses heading out in all directions, and some nice street art. My town could learn a thing or two.

I wandered around for a few hours looking around and playing Ingress. Some of my compatriots built a big farm there, and I was able to get a bunch of gear. After not playing much for the past 6 months, I was pretty much out of stuff to play with. Now I have a lot. Tonight the Resistance came and destroyed that lovely farm. And so it goes.

I had a nice late lunch in a brewery/restaurant. It was satisfying. I walked a little bit more, then came home to work on my doctoral stuff for a while. My final summer report is due on Sunday.

birds

A series of sketches on a wall on a side street. One of my favorite finds today. Birds.

My step-sister and her husband are coming over for dinner tomorrow. They are somewhat reclusive, and we don't see them much, so this is a nice treat. Not sure what I am going to cook, but something that doesn't require too much heat, as it will be 102 here tomorrow.

(no subject)

Jul. 21st, 2017 12:05 pm
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
So, i just read about the current state of Mueller's investigation of All The Smoke Around The Trump Campaign to calm myself down.

We have logs from our various web applications at work.
In one data center the logging analysis software has been upgraded.
I now need to log in with my 14 character, must have different case, numbers, and punctuation password, that i cannot repeat for 20-some generations, and that i must change every few months.

And the log in form is http, not https -- that is, all the text is clear and readable on the internal network.

I wrote the person responsible with a request that they switch to https as soon as possible. The response, it's too much work.

I desperately want to sniff his password and use it to log into his email account and forward the email exchange to the head of security.

Instead, my manager is going after the offender.

Steam.

July 20--Agatha and Edith

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:30 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
For some reason today I thought about whether I missed being a bedside nurse. I suppose I miss parts of it. I miss spending time with patients and their families, talking to them about what is going on, helping to get them through whatever it is they are getting through.

I miss using my critical care nursing skill set, which I developed over many years of practice. I could rely on my intuition and instincts, and almost always knew what to do. There is a nursing theorist who describes that process, and has written that it takes 10 years to get from novice to expert.

I don't think I could go back into the ICU again. It wouldn't be the same, and I don't think I could handle the relentless 12-hour shifts any more. I do miss it, thought. As I was writing this, I remembered the reason I thought about it. We drove past my old hospital on the way to take a walk in the rose garden and have lunch at a dim sum place in midtown.

wild rose

The rose garden was lovely as always. There were lots of people in the large park surrounding it, but very few people in the garden--mostly volunteers doing some pruning and watering. We wandered around for about a half-hour, sometimes stopping to sit on a bench and take it in.

grandfather plant

This reminded me of my grandfather's back yard. Not the grandfather I write about--the other one who died when I was fairly young--my dad's father. Our birthdays were one day apart, and when he turned 80, I turned 8. I remember him as an old man. His name was Joe.

I like the haziness of the picture. When I think of his back yard, it is hazy and somewhat desaturated in my memory, much like the image above. I could have sharpened it up, but let it be. I prefer my memories somewhat hazy.

Cambridge, MA, photos 2

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:51 pm
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[personal profile] microbie
This trip was a little unusual in that we spent the entire time in Cambridge, only passing through Boston to/from the airport.

On Saturday we walked around Cambridge with perpetual teen heartthrob VillageCharm, who endured my glacial eating speed with good humor. Our second stop was the Old Burial Ground, just across the street from Harvard. Charm dazzled us with his knowledge of gravestone trends, such as the skull and crossbones giving way to the winged skull:
IMG_1554_edited-1

Eventually this was replaced by the more peaceful motif of an urn and a weeping willow.
IMG_1552_edited-1
This is also a rare example of an intersection of mine and Charm's interest--a gravestone for someone with the surname Tupper.

The urn carved here looks like a magic lamp.
IMG_1555_edited-1

There were many gravestones like this. I liked the optical illusion that made the letters appear to vibrate.
IMG_1560

Then we were off in search of records, books, and whatever else caught our eye, like this ibis weather vane:
IMG_1566

IMG_1567

Our original plan was to walk from Harvard's square to MIT's, but I was having problems with my legs and couldn't walk the whole way, so we hopped on the T for the last leg. We had a fine meal at the medieval-sounding Meadhall (which only had four meads, all of them incredibly expensive), only letting Charm go home when he was in danger of falling asleep at the table.

July 19--Getting ready

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:12 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
As I was sitting in the bathroom this morning, thinking, I noticed a very small spider, not much bigger than an ant, had let itself down on a strand of web from the ceiling, and stopped at eye level with me, just a few inches away. We watched each other for a bit. Eventually it started climbing back up toward the ceiling and I went on my way to face the rest of the day. I saw it as a good sign.

I went into work today to put some time in on the curriculum revision I am working on. I finished the revision part, and got a ways into the new content I am adding. This is for the community IV therapy course we have our students complete. I talked to my boss about it a bit, and she told me she was going to get me some funding for the hours I am putting into it. She's great like that.

I spent about 5 hours on the project, then came home and read one of my Hardy Boys books for a while. As things stand in the book, they just got arrested for mail theft and are in jail on a $50,000 bond. I can't imagine they will be able to get out of this, but there are subsequent books, so maybe.

chocko on the table

Chocko basks in the late afternoon light on the breakfast table. Don't tell Malida.

Cambridge, MA, photos 1

Jul. 19th, 2017 08:27 pm
microbie: (Default)
[personal profile] microbie
I took all of the photos over the weekend; it was cloudy Wednesday through Friday. I stayed at the cheapest hotel for the conference, a Hyatt that managed to be close to nothing yet still in a city.
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The exterior is neat, but inside it was the 1980s, still: dark brown carpet and upholstery and beige wallpaper.

The ~half-mile walk to the conference took me past MIT's athletic fields; I didn't even realize that MIT has athletics. Their mascot is the Engineer, which is represented by a surprisingly ominous cartoon of a beaver:
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At first I thought the cartoon was of a profile of a weirdly shaped baseball hat.
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One of the many cool buildings on campus. I think this is a dorm or residence hall; it's across the street from the athletic fields.
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This is also part of the athletic complex.
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An enormous brick building in pristine condition. I wonder what it's used for.
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The conference was held in the dome-shaped building behind the white tent (which was set up on the last day of the conference).
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This sculpture, not far from the conference site, was a popular place for photos
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I think this building houses the nuclear reactor.
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I'm not sure whether these buildings are owned by MIT; there's no clear border between campus and non. They're near the area where I'd usually get lunch.
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One of my co-workers said that MIT has a lot of modern architecture, but it wasn't as widespread as she had made it sound. This stretch of buildings was pretty cool.
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More sculpture
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I am a terrible person, because the idea of something for future children made me giggle.
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(no subject)

Jul. 19th, 2017 03:43 pm
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Woo hoo! Caffeine, antihistamine, and analgesics! I'll have plenty on hand for tomorrow morning.

(no subject)

Jul. 19th, 2017 07:30 am
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Odd, how a perfectly reasonable night's sleep can have one more grumpy. I think it's all about antihistamines: in that i had only one left (forgetting to ask Christine when she did a grocery run). Fortunately the loooong commute from the hotel to the office across the highway means i can swing by a grocery and pick up a bottle of pills, plus band aids for where my shoes are rubbing my feet.

The B52's Love Shack is playing as muzak.

I should have brought a few tea bags with me. I thought i could make do with coffee, but i am not a morning coffee drinker. Either that or the drip coffee in the room was vile.

I paid for a month's use of AirDroid pro so i could easily move files to my phone. I have a "Music" folder, and in the "Music" folder i made a "_Keep on Phone_" folder. The music app couldn't find that folder, so i ditched the underscores and created a "000Keep on Phone". That too is not being found. With this last phone i've just had no luck with audio files. It's good that my preference is for audio books.
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
On my way to Ohio. 8 pm flights seem to be the way to go. Not only is it direct, but there was no line at security, and the plane is maybe half full. Yippee!!

Sunday I did get the rest I needed. My throat healed up, antihistamines made a difference, and all the other aches ... Well they don't seem as significant.

Yesterday & today I saw deer. I think I can identify two does by markings. One has a crooked ear, the other a white mark - a scar I would guess - on her right hip. Each day I have seen a doe& fawn. It seems plausible that they were the Same pair today & yesterday. Oh Monday a young buck came through as well.

I find it curious that I hadn't seen deer in daylight for a long time. Then they seemed to get active again.

They are nibbling at the garden but today's WRATH is reserved for the squirrel. I've been watching my tomato volunteer #2 set nice large fruit- and today I saw a squirrel near the raised bed . At lunch I went out to find half Eaten green tomatoes scattered under the plant.

FlE.
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