Misc

Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:20 pm
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[personal profile] ranunculus
Worked a show at the Masonic Auditorium yesterday.  Singer named Kalid.  Very minimal load in after which I came home and slept solidly for an hour and a half.  Went back to run followspot on an utterly forgettable show.  No work now till Monday.
Planning a trip to Ukiah on Sunday with Donald. 
  • I want to check the drip irrigation and see if the coyotes chewed it up again. 
  • Carrie needs help finding a fault in the fence at the Iris Barn.
  • We plan to spend a bunch of time painting the plywood for the Shelter.  I want it done soon!!!
Got the garden watered today.  Tomorrow I should water again, it was really dry.
Called the Ranch insurance agent and reminded her that I need a breakdown of the insurance cost.  
Now I need to write an e-mail to the Union office about a couple of things. 





Ukiah

Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:29 pm
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[personal profile] ranunculus
A flying trip to Ukiah on Tuesday Sept 19th was very satisfying.
  • The planning department gave me an extension to my permit for the shelter at the Red Barn.  It is hard to believe that it has been a whole year since we began trying to get that thing together.
  • Johnny came and helped me get the last 6 sheets of roofing onto the shelter. 
  • I purchased more paint primer (now there is 10 gallons) and 5 gallons of the tan top coat. 
  • I fixed a lot of problems on the Howell Creek drip irrigation.  Sadly a whole lot of plants had died of lack of water.  It looks like Mr Coyote got in and chewed up the drip lines so he could get a drink.  Even with the dead plants there were plenty of plants that survived, thank goodness.  Most of the damage was on the lower end, the upper end was relatively unscathed. 
  • I pulled the tarp back over the top of one of the storage tents.  The knots holding it had been tied by my helper and were clearly sub-standard.  Shouldn't be a problem now.  The tarp is to help reduce sun damage to the tent itself. 
  • Dave the Deer Hunter came by as we were finishing up the roofing and we agreed to have dinner together up at his camp.  It was very pleasant, if sad, since Dave's dad died recently. 
Altogether the day was beautiful and I got everything on my infamous "list" for the day done. 


zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I woke up about 5 minutes before the alarm went up and made some coffee and gave the cats their treats. I got ready for work and left before the sun came up. Tomorrow is the autumn equinox, and the days will continue to get shorter. Ok with me.

One of the nurses on the cardiac unit told me that my student would be taking care of a guy with a brand new really small pacemaker. I had heard about it a few weeks ago, but hadn't yet read anything about it until today. It is really really small. See Picture Below. It is implanted via a catheter through the groin, into the right ventricle of the heart. It has a battery life of up to 12 years. Pretty amazing, considering my phone battery can't even last a day.

Micra"/

While I was hanging out at the hospital today, I thought of something interesting to write here, but now I have forgotten it. I guess it wasn't that interesting after all. What could be more interesting than a picture of my thumb?

america

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:20 am
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[personal profile] 1spirit
why isnt the american dream portrayed on news, which is the real reality TV of america

people are dumbed down, told that their fate, healthwise, isnt actually in their own hands

we are taught that we'll die if we go without food for so long.

we are programmed that only a pill will cure a disease. its sickening

we are made to go to school, incur debt, and slave it off.

the lucky ones have parents who havent bought into this. and friends, even.

i have this nagging to create but i cant even put my thoughts together in space.
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I finished up my lecture this morning and we played an hour of Fluid and Electrolyte Jeopardy. I love when I have the time to do this, and the students enjoy it as well. The great thing about it is it gets them to put down their pens and really think about the information rather than simply taking it down.

I break them into groups that correspond with their clinical groups and start the game. Everyone always goes for the $500 questions first, which are the most difficult. I love hearing the small groups figuring out what the correct answer is--it shows critical thinking. It is also interesting to see the group process, and who takes the lead in problem solving. I have more of these scheduled, and the time to do them.

I took them to the hospital after that, and sat outside reading their journals. It was another beautiful day--in the low 70s with a breeze. My favorite kind of weather. By the time I was heading home, clouds were rolling in, and there was some rain to the north and west of us.

I tried to take a nap, but wasn't tired enough, so I watched the last half of the final Harry Potter movie, then made an early dinner.

insurgent cat

"What are signs and symptoms of Hyperparathyroidism?"

vices versa

Sep. 20th, 2017 08:36 pm
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[personal profile] microbie
Depression is a perfectly rational response to current events.

September 19--Hello Kitty Knows Best

Sep. 19th, 2017 08:27 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I presented my first lecture of the semester on fluid and electrolytes. Much of it is preparatory for the content that is to come. It's a long lecture--about 5 hours over 2 days. I'll finish it tomorrow. I don't really need 5 hours. I can cover it in 4, but I use the last hour to play Fluid and Electrolyte Jeopardy.

It was interesting that, even with all the little stories I drop in, the lecture times out to each break almost to the minute. When it is break time, I make a note on the slide "Hour 1, fall 2017" or something like that. I have been on the same slides for my breaks three semesters in a row.

One of my favorite things about lecturing is dropping in those little stories. Sometimes they are related to the content, but sometimes they are just stories about nursing in general. I am very comfortable in the classroom, even though I am a shy introvert. I think I have made that observation previously. Probably every semester, at about the same date. lol.

I had to spend some non-classroom time typing up some more stuff from our accreditation meeting yesterday. I did it early, before class began. I didn't want to go in early, but glad I did so I could get it done and sent out.

Malida and I had dinner at the sushi place again. In spite of having just read some article about never ordering bacon-wrapped anything, I ended up ordering some bacon-wrapped scallops. I saw the author's point. My other disappointment was seeing a frozen gyazo delivery truck parked out back. Anyway, Malida loves the sushi there, so we will be back again.

bacon wrapped anything

The weather is so perfect these days. I sat out in the back yard a bit this afternoon and looked at my garden. there was a hibiscus blossom, and I took a picture. It was pretty low on the plant, so I dubbed it a lowbiscus.

lowbiscus

I engaged in a debate with my first wife's cousin's husband, a Trump Supporter, about the potential repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. We went back and forth, but remained civil. I posed a question four different times: What happens to a person without health insurance, who doesn't meet the criteria for either Medicare or Medicaid, who becomes seriously ill? Do we deny them care? Four times he avoided the question. For me, this question is the heart of the debate.

(no subject)

Sep. 19th, 2017 06:56 am
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Saturday i worked in the yard, mainly eradicating stiltgrass and stands of Boehmeria cylindrica (False nettle, by which they mean "non-stinging nettle") by mechanical means.

Boehmeria cylindrica clearly reproduces successfully, so i want to get rid of it in a number of places where it is "weedy." On the other hand, it is native, so i should find some place(s) for it to thrive. I see one resource claims it prefers sandy or loamy soil: i wonder if there's actually loam in the places it is growing. I generally assume everything is clay.

So, in the first area of work there was the manual pulling out. The stilt grass is about a meter high, and heaven only knows what has made a home in the thick stands. I've not seen any snakes yet, but spiders and toads and bright green leafhoppers seem disrupted. I found one milkweed growing in the stand, Asclepias variegata (White milkweed) or A syriaca (common milkweed): that was delightful! And i found a good number my current favorite little plants: moonworts (or grapeferns). These have a single frond, and then a spore bearing structure lifted like a flag above the solar panel that is the leaf. This 2014 literature review describes them as rare but (at least) one species is definitely common here. I believe i've had success transplanting them, despite comments about them being challenging. I take that to mean that the interdependence with fungi is supported over the small distances in which i have moved them. Transplanting to potting soil would likely be bad.

I also rediscovered one of the colonies of Goodyera pubescens (rattlesnake orchid). It too is usually accompanied by the warning against transplanting because of the mycorrhizal interactions: i may try moving some to some places i feel i can more easily protect from trampling over time.

Later in the day i used the sling blade and the weed whacker and the lawn mower. The mower can deal with the tall stands, but i don't want to hit hidden stumps, any more than i already do. The weed whacker gets the grass all tangled in the drive: it's not a particularly good tool on the tall stands.

I grew a little disappointed in the lawn mower repair. I don't think the mechanism for raising and lowering works the way it is supposed to: it's as if the front is now at a fixed height. The lawn mower repair process was so distressing for Christine, i don't want to bring it up. But, fie, it was useful to have the great range in height.

--== ∞ ==--

Sunday began with me breaking the stylus on my phone. The version of the Galaxy Note i have was reported to have a stylus issue in that if you inserted it in the storage bit backwards, it would jam and there was little that could be done. Now i understand: while one can pull out the stylus, the little springy top, like the "clicker" on a retractable ball point, breaks off and jams in, disrupting whatever signal the phone has to turn on the pen functioning. I am glad that the new note has been released but i believe it is a bit larger than this phone - so my nice case wouldn't be used. And we bought this phone outright. After spending some time thinking about it, i decided that i am ok giving up the stylus and just using the phone as any other phone for a while longer. All the critical phone functionality still works, and i can always take a pad of paper outside with me.

If i were doing real field work, i would have a reason to spend the money on a new phone, i don't really now.

And there's also the question of the iPad, which has superior drawing applications, and whether i really need a second digital pad (that's smaller and lighter and "always" with me, sigh).

I worked myself up into other dithers on Sunday morning as well. Things i hadn't done for Meeting, baking for meeting for business potluck with a recipe that i hadn't used before, realizing i hadn't really left time for the longer than expected baking time, discovering i didn't quite have the right quantities of ingredients, running late....

I indulged myself the rest of the day after Meeting, going to a historical society presentation (the president is a member of Meeting as well) and reading a novel (a Maisy Dobbs mystery). I finished the book after dark and needed to take Carrie for her walk, so i went into Pittsboro and walked her on the streetlamp lit sidewalks. I think Carrie was delighted with the novelty, and i enjoyed it too. It will be agreeable to walk there this winter.

Monday was a long work day, mainly meetings. We had the first visit of the young woman we have hired to clean our bathrooms. She's incredibly professional, and someday she'll finish her vet school training and will take her professionalism on to her own vet practice. Until then, i think we'll be delighted with her help.
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[personal profile] zyzyly
Even though the students weren't there today, I had a busy day doing the stuff I do when students aren't there. I got in early to type up the notes from our last 4th semester team meeting so I could send them to my colleagues in advance of our next meeting this morning. Then I worked on accreditation stuff for a while, in anticipation of our accreditation team meeting this afternoon.

In between I worked on my next lecture. It deals with septic shock. The conference I attended last week had all the newest guidelines for sepsis, and a lot has changed in how we screen for sepsis, what we call what we find, and how we treat it. I will need to still teach the old stuff, as the questions on the licensing exams are somewhat behind the latest trends. I will teach the new stuff too, though, because that's what the students will face when they get out in practice.

I called one of my old friends in the ICU who is in my old educator role. We chatted for a bit, and talked about how they are approaching the new guidelines. They are somewhat in the middle, between the old stuff and the new stuff, as is the hospital where I take my students. It took a long time to get people to take sepsis seriously and embrace the old guidelines. It is somewhat gratifying that they embraced them so vigorously that they are reluctant to let go, but they will, as they always do.

We had our team meeting, which went well. I am the faculty lead for our team this semester, and it feels kind of strange to be leading the meetings. I also get stuck taking the notes. In any case, we have a standard format for team notes now, and it works out well.

I usually try and get out of there and get lunch on the way home, but since I had an afternoon meeting, I walked over to the sandwich place next to the coffee place I like. I haven't eaten there in years, since I was in the photography program. After they opened, they invited student artists and photographers to hang their work, and sell it. I was able to hang a bunch of prints, and made more money than I ever expected.

Now that it is so close, I decided to get a sandwich. It was big--so big that I saved half for tomorrow. It was delicious as well, and only one of a substantial sandwich menu. I'll be back for sure.

sandwich

After I ate I got ready for my accreditation team meeting. It was productive, and we are all on the same page. We have a lot of work ahead of us, but we need to do that work anyway for our nursing board visit next year.

I came home and watched the first episode of the new Ken Burns documentary on Vietnam. The first episode related the history that led up to the war. Some of it I knew, but much was new to me. I think it is going to be a fascinating and illuminating story, as pretty much everything Ken Burns tackles is.

During our accreditation meeting, we got off track a bit and someone started talking about a student at another nursing program who wanted to take their service dog with them to their clinical rotation in the hospital, and about all the places dogs can't (or shouldn't go) in a hospital. In my mind I thought, "I have my subject line!"

September 17--Into the Woods.

Sep. 18th, 2017 07:31 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I managed to get Malida out into the world, and we drove out to the Cosumnes River Preserve, which is a nature preserve along the Cosumnes River. I seem to recall writing about this place before, and the whole thing about there only being one N in Cosumnes. In any case, we went out there for a walk.

It was a spectacular day for a walk. The temperature was in the mod 70s, and there was a gentle breeze from the west, which is where the best breezes come from. There were quite a few cars parked, but we really didn't see that many people on the trail. It's kind of spread out. We took the loop that goes out to the river, and then back through the fields.

I've been coming here since it first opened back in the 80s. I remember when they planted oak trees that are now getting large. It's always been one of my favorite places to come and think and walk.

into the woods

After our hike, which earned us about 11,000 steps each, we headed to the Korea BBQ place and had a nice lunch, then headed home to enjoy the balance of our weekend.

Two Days Off!

Sep. 18th, 2017 09:03 am
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[personal profile] ranunculus
It is a foggy, but not too cold morning here in SF.
Forgot to get my name on the work list on Friday.  It is easy to forget when I'm in the middle of some long work day!  Anyway that allowed me to have Sunday and Monday off.  Tue is TBD. 
Got catfood, dogfood, tea and milk yesterday.  Staples for our household!
Had a lovely dinner with Amrit who is here visiting for a while.  Amrit was our tenant for a couple of years.  He is now working all over the world for Google.  It just so happened that he's in town for a couple of weeks, so he's staying with us - sort of.  Being Amrit he's off here and there much of the time. 
Off to help M clean his apartment (not hard).  He has strict instructions NOT to vacuum until his neck heals. 

September 16--My little buddy Al

Sep. 16th, 2017 09:35 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I sat out on the back patio this morning, sipping my coffee and just enjoying the day. Nothing hanging over me. As I was sitting there, I heard the loud hummingbird approaching the feeder. He dwelled there for a moment, then flew toward me. He kind of flew back and forth sideways in front of me, getting closer and closer. When he was about 2 feet from me, he kind of hovered and watched me for close to a minute. Then he flew to the left of me and watched for a bit longer.

The feeder was almost empty, so I took it as a sign that he wanted new food, which I provided. I was thinking about him as I cleaned the feeder. He is the only one who makes noise like that. Most of them are pretty quiet. He is also the one that chases some of the other hummingbirds away from the feeder. I decided that he is the alpha hummingbird for this little piece of the world, and that the sound is deliberate. From now on I will call him Al.

No, I didn't have my camera with me. :(

I went out for a walk in the late morning. Malida is heavy into watching Game of Thrones, so didn't want to leave. This evening she proudly declared that she had walked almost 300 steps today! Lol. She works these 14 hour days, and I don't blame her for staying put on her day off. Tomorrow we are planning a little hike at the wildlife preserve.

I walked in the park. It was kind of overcast, and muggy, but only in the low 80s, which is tolerable. The park was full of people doing things. I did my usual circuit.

the park

This picture looks skewed to the right a bit, but I don't think it is. when I look through the viewfinder, I tend to skew to the left a bit. I don't know. I'm confused now.

Anyway, as I was getting toward the end of the walk, I added a resonator to an Ingress portal, and saw on the screen that this particular action elevated me to the next level. I don't play very aggressively any more, so it has taken a while to get to this level. I was pleased. Later, I looked at the stats generator and it is predicting that, at my current rate of play, I will get the highest level of a particular medal in the year 2080. I'll be 124 years old. Something to live for.

level 13

September 15--Exam I

Sep. 16th, 2017 11:51 am
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[personal profile] zyzyly
We had our first exam yesterday on the new platform. I got there super early for really no reason, since I had already set everything up, and couldn't open the exam until it was time to open it. So I sat and fretted about it for an hour. I was actually kind of anxious about the whole thing. Our students' grades come entirely from the 5 exams and the final, and I didn't want to be the one to screw things up.

I brought the students into the testing site about 15 minutes early in case there were problems with them getting into the testing site. They were all able to get in just fine. I, on the other hand, was unable to log into the teacher station and had to have the IT guy come up and take a look. Caps lock was on. D'oh!

We started the test on time and it went without a hitch. Meanwhile, at the alternative testing site, they were getting pop-up ads on their test screens, and IT had to come figure it out. Malware, I think.

About halfway through the test, I changed the access password, as the security people recommended. Almost immediately hands shot up all across the room. The students had been kicked out of the test. It was an easy fix and they all got back on. Note to self: don't change the password in the middle of the exam.

After the exam was done, I realized that I had spent so much time building the eval sites and the exam, that I never thought about how to grade it. Fortunately, this platform we are using is really intuitive, and after a couple of clicks I had it figured out. I was sweating it though, imagining all the scores disappearing into the mists, never to return.

Once the exam was graded and the scores were posted, I breathed a sigh of relief, and felt really good about the whole thing. I went home and took a nice nap.

exam 1

ARGH.

Sep. 15th, 2017 02:35 pm
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Complaints follow.

So, the poison ivy that grows 70' up the trunks of a dozen plus yellow pines. Yeah, i should get rid of it, yeah i've had irritations from little starts where i weed whack and mow, but, you know, it's actually a good bird food. (Admittedly, that's part of the problem and why it spreads.)

And the ticks. Ticks are terrible vermin, vectors for awful illnesses. But they are manageable, and seasonal. Dress right, be vigilant, etc. Give the pets their flea and tick treatments. Keep the grass mown. And if we got Guinea hens or chickens, they'd hunt those ticks down.

The spiders. SHUDDER. I really don't like spiders. But something happens here as autumn hints at an arrival: blam, the big orb weavers really get going. And webs across the driveway and the doors... shudder. And there's one of these three inch long Carolina Writing Spiders in bold yellow and black with her gorgeous web out at the compost pile. Uuuuuggggghhhhhh. I give her very wide berth. She's been there DAYS. Then there are always the wolf spiders. I'm getting pretty ... calm in negotiating access with them. I swear one was observing me as i was planting in the garden, waiting to see if i was going to get too close. She scurried away another two foot with her egg sack. But the spiders are the enemy of my enemy. And birds eat them.

I don't mind the few black racers and other snakes i've seen. My understanding is black racers will take on copperheads, so they're on the list of allies. Christine is very distressed by snakes, but she's coming to terms with them just as i am coming to terms with spiders.

But now, now.... [much swearing] fire ants. At least they aren't the invasive South American fire ants, just native red stinging ants.

September 14--Strawberry

Sep. 14th, 2017 09:02 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I spent the first part of the morning checking my students off on competencies. Unfortunately, there was a room mix-up, and all of our students ended up in a cramped space where we keep our hospital beds. We are still working out the room thing in our trailer village. Interestingly, there is another classroom in our little village, and when we moved, we were told that the program that was in that classroom couldn't be moved, so we weren't going to get the classroom.

Well, the program moved anyway, and the classroom was re-carpeted and repainted within 5 days of them moving out. Yay! Oh, wait, some other non-nursing program move in. Meanwhile, we are doing skills labs in a closet. Grrrr.

The balance of the day was spent assembling our first exam and figuring out how our two testing sites will work. Test security is a big deal, and no one is quite clear on how to optimize the security with this new platform. Apparently nursing is one of the few programs that utilizes computerized testing on campus, which just blows my mind.

I think I have it figured out, though it involves a lot of manually shifting the open and close dates in both testing sites, and trying to turn off our course site at the same time. By this time tomorrow, we will all know whether it worked or not. My reputation as the tech guy in the department is riding on it. :)

I read an interesting story about a guy who says he met Vladimir Putin in Paris in 1982, and described their adventures together. I don't think it is true, but it is a fascinating read. Here is the link: Vladimir on acid

We don't really have adequate bathroom facilities in the trailer village, so I generally mosey over to the art building, which is new, and has great bathrooms. One of the best things about being near the art building, other than the bathrooms, is all the random art that pops up in the breezeways and surrounding areas. It is an ever-changing landscape. I love walking around over there.

art guy

the mask slips.

Sep. 14th, 2017 09:07 pm
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[personal profile] microbie
The past couple of weeks have been filled with interviews for the two remaining candidates. Phone interviews, then in-person interviews, then video calls with the journal editor. I've tried not to talk work stuff here because it's not terribly interesting, but now I want to vent.

I think that I've mentioned already that both candidates could do the basic job. There are some important differences, though. Candidate #1's main strength is that she's very enthusiastic. She has no experience in writing, editing, or publishing and no experience in the journal subject. Candidate #2 has a master's degree in engineering plus a Ph.D. in science and society (her dissertation was about low-cost preventable blindness technologies, chiefly in India). She is currently guest editing a special issue of a sociology journal, so she understands academic publishing and has done most of the steps (soliciting, writing, peer review).

Each candidate interviewed with three people besides me when they came to the office. Three of four thought candidate #2 was better, above and beyond having more credentials and experience. The fourth person thought they were equally suitable.

The journal editor has favored candidate #1 since the resume stage, but I wasn't prepared for how different he was with each candidate. With #1, he was friendly and forthcoming about the journal and his hopes for this new position. He gently declined all of her ideas but told me that she has the "spark" he thinks is necessary for the job. With #2, he was aggressive and confrontational from the beginning. He didn't talk about the journal or the job but instead asked her "what do you think that you bring to this position?" She mentioned that she knows some people working in a subfield, and he asked her to name some of the top people in that field. She declined and said she'd ask one of the people she knows. In short, he bullied her, which made her more nervous and unsure than she'd been with us in the office.

The journal editor decided that candidate #2 was "lying" about her expertise and has said that he can't work with her. I argued with him, pointing out she's better qualified and has more experience, but he said it would be a mistake to hire her. He actually got angry at me. I've always known that he has the capacity to be a bully, but he has always hidden it behind a mask of patriarchal benevolence. But in that brief instance, the mask slipped, and his ugliness was in full view.

Not only is candidate #2 more qualified, she's also part of an underrepresented group in science (and, just as a woman, in engineering). Hiring candidate #1 on the basis of "spark" despite her lack of hard credentials, especially over a very strong minority candidate, seems to me to be begging to be sued for discrimination. Yet that's what my boss is currently contemplating. And, because I am a nice person and not an asshole, I've said that I can work with either candidate (although of course candidate #1 is going to need *a lot* more training).

So in all likelihood the bully will get his way, and my organization will be (legitimately) vulnerable to an accusation of racism. A stellar turnout, all around.

My shrink is not happy about this, but I'm going to say something to the journal editor about how he was unfair to candidate #2. It won't be anything big and obnoxious; in fact, it'll be something that can have multiple meanings, like "I saw how you treated candidate 2, and I won't forget it." He'll probably say, "good, that's how you should deal with people like that." In other words, saying something to him won't do anything to him, but calling out a bully will make me feel a whole lot better.

Oy

Sep. 14th, 2017 08:02 am
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Irma irma irma....

I did spend some good time outside this weekend. Our septic area is looking clear, and i even found some flowers that i had planted in May including a purchased goldenrod I bought last April.

Spent time with my parents after Meeting on Sunday. My dad was still beside himself about his mother in the Tampa area. On Monday she still had power, and all is well with most of the family down there. One uncle was out of power, but it sounds like that's it. Monday after work i was going to walk both Carrie and my parents. They came over at 5 pm on the dot, just as it started to rain. Christine was kind enough to walk Carrie, who showed off her stylin' yellow rain coat, while i chatted with M&D. I was tired from a late night watching Irma, so, after reading a draft of Christine's latest book review i retired.

Yesterday i worked on writing a script to generate a UML (Unified Modeling Language) diagram of some of our team's java code. I ended up having to count whether curly brackets, which delimit nested sections of code, were open or closed and there's still a great deal of imperfection in the diagram generation. On the other hand, i met my need. I do hope i can find a good excuse to run the script on some other code, both to continue to improve it and to get some return on the investment. I worked late on it, so it was well dinner time by the time i stopped. We needed to do a grocery run, so we ate out at a new-to-us-place, "Moon Asian Bistro." I had a rare challenge of not knowing what i wanted (i wanted food FAST as i was hungry), so i ordered the hibachi shrimp, following Christine's lead. It hit the spot. We then spent a little too long at the grocery, buying many indulgences for Carrie.

Late night.

So, i'm feeling a little dislocated. I think i'm going to try and do a little planning and email tonight -- try and get some perspective on priorities like some banking tasks, and miscellaneous household to-dos.

Although the temptation is to skim the Diana Gabaldon Outlander e-book that i borrowed ....

And so i did that, having another late night. I feel rebooted, as i usually do when i read for hours at a stretch. I am also a little cranky because the Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court SciFi quality slowly slipped into bodice-ripper territory. I was skimming to finish, but haven't quite. It looks like the sequels run on and on, so i'm not sure it ever finishes.
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I attended the cardiology conference today. There were about 8 speakers, presenting topics over 45 minutes each. It was one of the best conferences I have been to in a long time. I learned the latest on a bunch of things, saw some cool videos, and saw some people I hadn't seen in a long time. All my students were there as well, and they seemed to enjoy it.

The coolest thing I saw was a video that a cardiovascular interventionist showed of a robotic-assisted heart valve repair. There are 4 arms inserted between the ribs, and two surgeons control them remotely, sitting at consoles with a screen and hand controllers. I have never seen anything like it. Google DaVinci Robotics if you want to see more about it.

davinci robotics

I saw a bunch of former students there, some from years ago, as well as someone I worked with when I was a brand-new nurse. I couldn't remember her name, but she remembered mine. I really enjoyed it. This healthcare organization, Dignity, is really great about making sure my students have a good experience.

After I got home I rested for a while. The temps are in the 70s this evening, and I opened all the windows to let the cool air in. Mook came and sat with me, and gave my foot a tail hug.

mook tail

We have skills lab on campus tomorrow, then our first test on Friday. We are using a whole new testing platform, and I am the one setting it up. I'm hoping it works, but if it doesn't then I'm hoping for a spectacular failure. Not really--I want it to work.

Lightning

Sep. 12th, 2017 10:51 pm
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
Walked out of work last night into a thunderstorm with frequent flashes of lightning and pouring rain!!  The rain is a bit unusual for this time of year, and the lightning was by far the most intense storm I've seen in San Francisco.

(no subject)

Sep. 12th, 2017 10:29 pm
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
In total it took 7 electricians more than 20 hours to load in this show.  Should have been done in 8.  Sigh. 
This morning the client was desperate for me to "get the lights focused"  So I went around in my boom lift and focused all the lights, generally on imaginary stages that might or might not move.  Another crew went around in a scissors lift (way, way easier to work out of for this kind of thing). The second crew added pipes to the trusses so the cables from the truss drop down next to the wall instead of in the seating area.  Sadly they were behind me.  The weight of the pipe rolled every single truss so all the lights were completely out of focus.  So I went BACK around with my awkward boom lift and refocused every single light.   I will just mention that the pipes should have gone on the truss while it was still down at floor level, at the same time we hung the lights. 
Eventually, at the end of the second day, the stages were placed.  At that point the client decided she hated our floor uplights and changed where they went.  Her placement left half of the 6' long striplight hanging off the edge of the stage.  The carpenters built little "legs' that we screwed the striplight feet (called trunions) to.  I thought it was a nifty solution.

Today was day three of this show.  Not much has changed, the stage manager is desperately dealing with poor equipment and problems while I'm sitting quietly making lights go on and off.  Wish I could refocus a couple of my lights....  
I swear that good, well organized shows exist.  I've seen lovely light plots, and worked for well prepared bosses.  Just not recently!
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